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FOOD ALLERGY INFORMATION


What is a food allergy?

A food allergy is a reaction to an ingested food protein that causes a defensive response from the immune system. The immune system mistakenly identifies the ingested protein as a harmful substance and releases histamines and other chemicals into the bloodstream. The released histamines are what cause the allergy symptoms to surface.

 

Food Allergy Statistics

bullet An estimated 4% of the United States' population suffers from some sort of food allergy. With an estimated US population of over 306 million, that results in over 12 million people who suffer from food allergies
bullet Each year, the FDA estimates that anaphylaxis from food allergies results in 30,000 Emergency Room visits, 2,000 hospitalizations and 150 deaths
bullet It has been found that 160 foods can cause allergic reactions

 

Common Food Allergens

There are eight common allergenic foods. These foods account for 90% of food allergic reactions, and are the food sources from which many other ingredients are derived. The food service should take proper precautions to prevent cross-contamination and be prepared for allergies of these types.
 

bullet Milk
bullet Eggs
bullet Fish (examples: bass, flounder, cod)
bullet Crustacean shellfish (examples: crab, lobster, shrimp)
bullet Tree nuts (examples: almonds, walnuts, pecans)
bullet Peanuts
bullet Wheat (examples: flour, breads, pastas, cake)
bullet Soybeans

 

Food Allergy Symptoms

bullet Hives
bullet Flushed skin or rash
bullet Tingling or itchy sensation in the mouth
bullet Face, tongue, or lip swelling
bullet Vomiting and/or diarrhea
bullet Abdominal cramps
bullet Coughing or wheezing
bullet Dizziness and/or lightheadedness
bullet Swelling of the throat and vocal cords
bullet Difficulty breathing
bullet Anaphylaxis
bullet Loss of consciousness

 

Cross Contamination

Cross contamination is one of the most common causes for allergic reactions to food. Cross contamination is the mixing of different foods to where their proteins mix. Cross-contamination is especially bad when dealing with food allergies because if an allergy causing food touches an allergy safe food, that allergy safe food may now be contaminated with the allergy. This causes a potential problem for those who suffer from food allergies. Common locations for cross contamination can be cutting boards, pots, pan, plates, utensils and frying oil. All common food allergens should be stored so they don't touch each other or any other food.

 

Treatment of Food Allergies

The following treatment suggestions for allergic reaction are commonly accepted methods for treating food allergies. However, in the event of a reaction, be sure to seek medical attention.

 

bullet Carry an over-the-counter anti-histamine (example: Benadryl, Claritin) to treat minor reactions
bullet Carry an auto-injector device con­taining epinephrine (adrenaline) that you can get by prescription and give to yourself if you think you are experiencing a severe food allergic reaction.
bullet Seek medical help immediately if you experience a food allergic reaction, even if you have already given yourself epinephrine, either by calling 911 or getting transportation to an emergency room.

 

 

 

   

LATEX ALLERGY INFORMATION


What is a Latex Allergy

A Latex Allergy is a sensitivity to natural rubber latex. Latex allergies most often results from the overexposure to natural rubber latex. An allergic reaction to latex can be triggered by the inhalation or ingestion of natural rubber latex proteins.

 

Latex Allergy Statistics

It was found that about 1 percent of the US population suffers from a Latex Allergy. That calculates to over 3 million people in the US. However, those statistics were collected almost 10 years ago. Therefore, they are outdated. The number of people effected by Latex Allergies has grown greatly since then.

 

Common Sources of Latex Reactions

bullet Tires
bullet Rubber Balloons
bullet Many Medical Products
bullet Rubber Cleaning Gloves
bullet Tape
bullet Shoes
bullet Playgrounds with floor padding made with recycled tires
bullet Latex Gloves
bullet Produce picked using Latex Gloves (e.g. mushrooms)
bullet New Cars
bullet Most new carpeting
bullet Many new shoes
bullet Many Rugs
bullet Adhesives
bullet Rubber Fitness Center Flooring
bullet Hotel rooms cleaned with Latex gloves
bullet Products manufactured with Latex gloves

 

Latex Allergy Symptoms

bullet Hives
bullet Flushed skin or rash
bullet Tingling or itchy sensation in the mouth
bullet Face, tongue, or lip swelling
bullet Vomiting and/or diarrhea
bullet Abdominal cramps
bullet Coughing or wheezing
bullet Dizziness and/or lightheadedness
bullet Swelling of the throat and vocal cords
bullet Difficulty breathing
bullet Anaphylaxis
bullet Loss of consciousness

 

Latex in Hospitals

Unfortunately, many medical professionals do not understand what latex allergies are or how to treat them. The problem with dealing with Latex allergies in the medical field is that there are over 50,000 medical products manufactured for medical use (Click Here for a list). Therefore, to make a truly Latex free medical environment, the Latex gloves and all other medical products have to be removed. In addition, many medical facilities do not understand that Latex reactions can be cause not just by contact or ingestion, but also by inhalation. If there are products that contain natural rubber latex being used, it is possible that a reaction can be triggered in an allergic person just by breathing in the Latex proteins. Latex proteins are very small and potentially have the capability of passion through HVAC and air conditioner filters. So, no matter what care is taken by a facility to make a room or section latex free, there is the potential that the area is still contaminated.

 

The problem most medical facilities face is that, alternatives to Latex gloves and products containing Latex can be costly. Latex gloves must be replaced by another type of glove that has the capability to act as a barrier to blood born pathogens. This narrows the alternative glove types to nitrile and neoprene; vinyl and poly gloves do not have this capability.

 

If you have a Latex allergy and are in need of medical attention, call the facility ahead of time to find out what their standards are for dealing with your situation. Depending on how severe your allergy is, they may or may not have an option for you. If you have reactions to latex that are triggered just by inhalation, be very cautious about where you seek medical attention.

 

 

Latex in Restaurants

Most restaurants throughout the United States use Latex gloves to prepare their food. This is because most ownership, administration, management and staff in the foods service industry have not received the education necessary to understand the effect of Latex on those who are allergic. Once Latex gloves are used in a kitchen, the entire work area may become contaminated. The Latex protein easily spread to other surfaces by clinging to pots, pans, utensils, work surfaces, dishes and other surfaces. Once the food makes contact a contaminated surface, the food becomes contaminated with the Latex proteins. This is an obvious problem for someone who suffers from a Latex allergy. Additionally, most food service workers do not understand the difference between Latex, Vinyl, Poly or Nitrile glove types. Therefore, when requesting information about the types of gloves used, workers may not give the correct information.

 

The best practice to follow when eating at restaurants, for safety sake, is to completely avoid restaurants that use Latex gloves. To determine which gloves are being used in an establishment, insist on seeing the box of gloves for yourself. This method will guarantee your safety; as long as the gloves you see are the only ones they use.

 

 

Living with a Latex Allergy

Unfortunately, there is no cure for a latex allergy. Therefore avoidance is the only course of action. Many people who suffer from a Latex allergy are still able to live long happy lives just by being cautious and following a few guidelines:

 

bullet Eat only at latex free restaurants
bullet Call ahead to medical care facilities to ensure they are Latex free and know ahead of time where you can go for medical care
bullet Avoid all the common causes of Latex allergy reaction listed above
bullet Try to keep track of what you eat and are exposed to. If you have a reaction, you can often think back and understand what caused your reaction for future knowledge
bullet Plan ahead for any travel and notify hotels and lodging of your needs
bullet Carry antihistamines and an Epi-pen at all times

 

Emergency Treatment of Latex Allergies

The following treatment suggestions for allergic reaction are commonly accepted methods for treating general allergies. However, in the event of a reaction, be sure to seek medical attention.

 

bullet Carry an over-the-counter anti-histamine (example: Benadryl, Claritin) to treat minor reactions
bullet Carry an auto-injector device con­taining epinephrine (adrenaline) that you can get by prescription and give to yourself if you think you are experiencing a severe food allergic reaction.
bullet Seek medical help immediately if you experience an allergic reaction, even if you have already given yourself epinephrine, either by calling 911 or getting transportation to an emergency room. Just be sure to warn the medical staff of your Latex allergy before arriving at any medical care facility.

 

 

 

 

At LatexAllergyInfo.com, you can:

  • Obtain detailed information about living with a Latex allergy
  • Obtain in-depth information about Latex in restaurants
  • Sign the petition for change whether you have an allergy or just support the cause
  • Submit information about your symptoms for use in better understanding Latex allergies
  • Submit your story about your experiences with Latex allergies

 

 

About LatexAllergyInfo.com

 

Latex Allergy Info was the predecessor to the concept of this Association. Ryan Sanchez & Veronica Castellana had lived with the allergy for years and saw the need for real information about living with a Latex allergy. At the time there was no real information about living a healthy and fruitful life with a Latex allergy; there was only obscure information scattered throughout the web. From living with the allergy, they gained a deep understanding that needed to be passed to other sufferers. One of the goals of the site is to gather statistical data from Latex allergy sufferers. Therefore, the Latex Petition was created. With that petition, data is collected about symptoms, number of sufferers, number of supporters for the cause and real life experiences. This data will be used to prove that Latex allergies are a real problem that need to be addressed.

 

As time passed, our message was not reaching the audience we desired. Restaurants, hotels, bars, cruise lines, airlines, and manufactures had not conformed to any standards for dealing with Latex allergies. The Association for Allergy Safety & Education (AASE) was born to help spread the message and create standards that these organizations must meet.

 

Visit Latex Allergy Info Now >>

 

 

 

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